Culture: The First Thanksgiving

THE FIRST THANKSGIVING
AT PLYMOUTH

“So once in every year we throng

Upon a day apart,

To praise the Lord with feast and song

In thankfulness of heart.”

~Arthur Guiterman,

in “The First Thanksgiving”

I thought it would be only proper to have a brief history lesson on the first day of Thanksgiving to remind us what this special holiday is really about. There are only two primary, official records about the first Thanksgiving in November, 1621, just one year after the first pilgrims settled in Plymouth on the Mayflower. 

The first excerpt comes from Edward Winslow in his book Mourt’s Relation and the second comes from Of Plymouth Plantation by William Bradford. I have included the original 17th Century writings as well as the “translations” into modern writing. 

The third writing is from a pilgrim who came to America on the second ship to arrive, The Fortune. The writer is William Hilton and he is writing to one of his cousins about his plantation’s state and the produce and game available, including turkey! 

Edward Winslow, Mourt’s Relation : 
“Our harvest being gotten in, our governour sent foure men on fowling, that so we might after a speciall manner rejoyce together, after we had gathered the fruits of our labours ; they foure in one day killed as much fowle, as with a little helpe beside, served the Company almost a weeke, at which time amongst other Recreations, we exercised our Armes, many of the Indians coming amongst us, and amongst the rest their greatest king Massasoyt, with some ninetie men, whom for three dayes we entertained and feasted, and they went out and killed five Deere, which they brought to the Plantation and bestowed on our Governour, and upon the Captaine and others.  And although it be not always so plentifull, as it was at this time with us, yet by the goodness of God, we are so farre from want,  that we often wish you partakers of our plentie.”

In modern spelling
“Our harvest being gotten in, our governor sent four men on fowling, that so we might after a special manner rejoice together, after we had gathered the fruits of our labors; they four in one day killed as much fowl, as with a little help beside, served the Company almost a week, at which time amongst other Recreations, we exercised our Arms, many of the Indians coming amongst us, and amongst the rest their greatest king Massasoit, with some ninety men, whom for three days we entertained and feasted, and they went out and killed five Deer, which they brought to the Plantation and bestowed on our Governor, and upon the Captain and others.  And although it be not always so plentiful, as it was at this time with us, yet by the goodness of God, we are so far from want,  that we often wish you partakers of our plenty.”

William BradfordOf Plimoth Plantation :
In the original 17th century spelling
“They begane now to gather in ye small harvest they had, and to fitte up their houses and dwellings against winter, being all well recovered in health & strenght, and had all things in good plenty; fFor as some were thus imployed in affairs abroad, others were excersised in fishing, aboute codd, & bass, & other fish, of which yey tooke good store, of which every family had their portion. All ye somer ther was no want.  And now begane to come in store of foule, as winter approached, of which this place did abound when they came first (but afterward decreased by degrees).  And besids water foule, ther was great store of wild Turkies, of which they tooke many, besids venison, &c. Besids, they had about a peck a meale a weeke to a person, or now since harvest, Indean corn to yt proportion.  Which made many afterwards write so largly of their plenty hear to their freinds in England, which were not fained,  but true reports.”

In modern spelling
“They began now to gather in the small harvest they had, and to fit up their houses and dwellings against winter, being all well recovered in health and strength and had all things in good plenty.  For as some were thus employed in affairs abroad, others were exercised in fishing, about cod and bass and other fish, of which they took good store, of which every family had their portion. All the summer there was no want; and now began to come in store of fowl, as winter approached, of which this place did abound when they came first (but afterward decreased by degrees).  And besides waterfowl there was great store of wild turkeys, of which they took many, besides venison, etc. Besides, they had about a peck of meal a week to a person, or now since harvest, Indian corn to that proportion.  Which made many afterwards write so largely of their plenty here to their friends in England, which were not feigned but true reports.”

The Letter of William Hilton,

Passenger on the Fortune

Letter written in November of 1621

Loving Cousin,

At our arrival in New Plymouth , in New England, we found all our friends and planters in good health, though they were left sick and weak, with very small means; the Indians round about us peaceable and friendly; the country very pleasant and temperate, yielding naturally, of itself, great store of fruits, as vines of divers sorts in great abundance.  There is likewise walnuts, chestnuts, small nuts and plums, with much variety of flowers, roots and herbs, no less pleasant than wholesome and profitable.  No place hath more gooseberrries and strawberries, nor better.  Timber of all sorts you have in England doth cover the land, that affords beasts of divers sorts, and great flocks of turkey, quails, pigeons and partridges; many great lakes abounding with fish, fowl, beavers, and otters.  The sea affords us great plenty of all excellent sorts of sea-fish, as the rivers and isles doth variety of wild fowl of most useful sorts.  Mines we find, to our thinking; but neither the goodness nor quality we know.  Better grain cannot be than the Indian corn, if we will plant it upon as good ground as a man need desire.  We are all freeholders; the rent-day doth not trouble us; and all those good blessings we have, of which and what we list in their seasons for taking.

Our company are, for most part, very religious, honest people; the word of God sincerely taught us every Sabbath; so that I know not any thing a contented mind can here want.  I desire your friendly care to send my wife and children to me, where I wish all the friends I have in England; and so I rest.

Your loving kinsman,

William Hilton

Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

Information gathered using: http://www.pilgrimhall.org/1stthnks.htmhttp://www.pilgrimhall.org/HiltonWilliamLetter.htm and Young, Alexander, Chronicles of the Pilgrim Fathers.  Boston: Charles C. Little and James Brown, 1841.
Advertisements
This entry was posted in Culture, Thanksgiving and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Culture: The First Thanksgiving

  1. Hi, I have been following your site and more and more I like it. I would like you to see my page Hotels Warsaw , we have performed recently. I hope you like it and you comment it.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s